101 Cooking For Two - Everyday Recipes for Two: How to Grill a T-bone or Porterhouse Steak - A Tutorial

Saturday, July 27, 2013

How to Grill a T-bone or Porterhouse Steak - A Tutorial

How to Grill a T-bone or Porterhouse Steak - A Tutorial from 101 Cooking For Two
How to cook a t-bone steak seems to be a problem for a lot of people. Well here is an easy never fail method. You can be the "grill master" too and have an excellent grilled steak in 10 minutes every time.

The Meat

The grade of beef is critical to the final outcome. This is really fairly easy. U.S. Prime is the top 2%. It is upper end restaurant type stuff. Expensive and you probably will not pay the price. U.S. Choice is where you're are buying. About half of all beef falls into the Choice category. U.S. Select (formerly Good) does sound OK and it is just that "OK". It is the lowest grade commonly sold at retail and is less juicy and tender. I use Choice. I have a good "look" at it since choice covers most of the market and the marbling can be quit variable. Also, I want the market to trim it well. I don't like paying $12+ a pound for a large piece of fat that should have been trimmed off.

Lets talk a little about t-bone vs. porterhouse steaks.  Both cuts come from the short loin which is between the rib and the sirloin. The larger side is really a strip steak and the small side a tenderloin (filet). In a T-Bone the tenderloin must measure a minimum of 1/2 in across the center and the porterhouse a minimum of 1 1/4 inches. So they are basically the same cut of meat except for more filet on the porterhouse. If they are the same price, get the porterhouse. My wife is a porterhouse hound...

A few last comments.
  • Thickness: all the "experts" want 1 1/2 inch... really that is a pound and a half of cow. Have your butcher cut it at 1 inch. You will find both 1 inch and 3/4 inch in the pre-cut. I think the 3/4 is too thin, I want some meaty center.
  • Fed type: "grass fed" seem to be the rage. NO NO NO. I grew up on grass fed. It tastes like grass to me.
  • Cow type: I find Angus a bit tastier.

The Grill

Any grill should work. I use natural gas. A charcoal grill will be fine also. You just need to get it hot...very hot. My grill has a surface temperature that is routinely at 600 degrees plus. You don't really need quite that hot.

I should note that there is a reverse searing method of cooking that is somewhat the opposite of this method. You start with a low grill and get the meat to about the internal temperature you want and then crank it up to finish with a sear. Sounds a little fussy to me. I will try it some day.

The Method

This is so easy. Allow to rest to room temperature if possible. This is not ground meat so it is safe. If you don't rest it, you will need to cook a little longer to get the internal temp you want. Read that as dry it out.

Trim the extra fat. You won't eat it and it will cause flairs on the grill that will burn your expensive meat.

Salt. There is some debate about the timing here. Salt will pull the water out of meat but then the salt and the water will absorb back into the meat. That take 45 to 60 minutes. So if you salt at the start of the rest, it is really good. If you salt at the end it is good also but maybe not quite as good. Do not salt with less than an hour left in the rest unless it is the last 10 minutes. This may pull water out of the meat and it will not have time to reabsorb.

Seasoning. Pepper is a must and we like garlic so my 7:2:2 seasoning (see my post on making 7:2:2 HERE) is perfect here. Or just use salt and pepper. I put the pepper and garlic on with the salt. See above salt note.

Oil: not needed

The Grilling: The grates must be cleaned and oiled. The grate is going to be very hot and olive oil has a lower smoke point. Use a standard vegetable oil. Grill the first side for 5 minutes. Use a watch and do not just guess. If your are into cross grill marks, rotate 90 degrees at 2 1/2 minutes. After the 5 minutes then flip. Cook on the second side for about 3 minutes for rare, 4 for medium rare and 5 for medium. We generally like our meat at about 150. That is over cooked for many. You will read about a "touch" method of check if the steak is done. It probably works for pros or semi-pros but really for us normal people not so much. Get the thermometer out.


The Rest: DO NOT SKIP. During the cooking process, water comes out of the cells. If you cut the meat immediately, it will just drain on your plate. Let it rest uncut at least 5 minutes but 10 is better. The fluid will absorb back into the the meat.

Steak sauce: need I say this... just say NO.

Rating

Always 5


Rest the steaks at room temperature for 1-2 hours if possible allowing the steaks to come to room temperature.
Apply salt and pepper at the start of you resting period. At the end is OK if skipping the rest or you forgot.  Use a course salt and pepper. I used my 7:2:2 which is kosher salt:pepper:garlic
 Trim the beef of extra fat. This is important to prevent "flair ups" that will burn your expensive meat.
Preheat your grill to maximum. Yep, as hot as it will go. Clean and oil well. Do not just olive oil here due to low smoke point.
 Place over direct heat.
In five minutes (by the clock) flip the meat. If your are into crossed grill marks, you should have rotated the meat 90 degrees at about 2 1/2 minutes.
How to Grill a T-bone or Porterhouse Steak - A Tutorial from 101 Cooking For Two
Grill for approximately 3 more minutes for rare, 4 more minutes for medium-rare and 5 minutes for medium (150). Your timing will vary a little so as always, check the temperature. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.


How to Grill a T-bone or Porterhouse Steak - A Tutorial



How to cook a t-bone steak seems to be a problem for a lot of people. Well here is an easy never fail method. You can be the "grill master" too and have an excellent grilled steak in 10 minutes every time.

Ingredients

  • T-Bone or Porterhouse Steaks
  • Salt and pepper to taste OR 7:2:2

Instructions

  1. Rest the steaks at room temperature for 1-2 hours if possible allowing the steaks to come to room temperature.
  2. Apply salt and pepper at the start of you resting period. At the end is OK if skipping the rest or you forgot. Use a course salt and pepper. I used my 7:2:2 which is kosher salt:pepper:garlic .
  3. Trim the beef of extra fat. This is important to prevent "flair ups" that will burn your expensive meat.
  4. Preheat your grill to maximum. Yep, as hot as it will go. Clean and oil well. Do not just olive oil here due to low smoke point.
  5. Place over direct heat. In five minutes (by the clock) flip the meat. If your are into crossed grill marks, you should have rotated the meat 90 degrees at about 2 1/2 minutes.
  6. Grill for approximately 3 more minutes for rare, 4 more minutes for medium-rare and 5 minutes for medium (150). Your timing will vary a little so as always, check the temperature. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.
Yield: 2 steaks
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cooking Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

Updated

September 22 2013

Dan Mikesell

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1 Comments:

At August 6, 2013 at 6:26 PM , Blogger Chris said...

We love a good porterhouse. I typically buy choice but also check the select beef because I have seen decently marbled select ON OCCASION.

 

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